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Doctors have debunked claims that the energy drink Celsius contains the same ingredients used in the popular weight-loss drug Ozempic.

The claim is making waves on TikTok, with the search term ‘Celsius drink ozempic’ reaching 11.7 million views.

Health experts call the claim ‘ridiculous,’ explaining that the drink’s high caffeine likely suppresses the appetite causing weight loss

The trove of TikTok videos is also being urged with caution, as consuming above-average caffeine levels can lead to liver or kidney damage, which consumers who slugged back too many Celsius drinks have claimed.

TikTokers claim that the energy drink contains Ozempic, the brand name for the medication semaglutide, which is approved for type 2 diabetes and weight management

One 12-ounce can of Celsius contains 200 milligrams of caffeine, which is more than many other energy drink brands. This is also twice the caffeine or a regular cup of coffee

What is Celsius? 

Celsius is an energy drink that claims to be made with ‘healthier ingredients,’ including ginger, green tea and essential vitamins. 

According to the brand’s website, the drinks contain no sugar, aspartame, high fructose corn syrup, or artificial preservatives. 

However, a recent lawsuit alleged that the ‘no preservatives’ claim was fake given that the drink contains citric acid. People who bought Celsius products between January 1, 2015, and November 23, 2022, were eligible for a $250 payout. 

One 12-ounce can contains 200 milligrams of caffeine, twice that of an eight-ounce cup of coffee.

This is more than that of brands like Monster, Red Bull, and Rockstar, as well as a shot of espresso or a cup of cold brew. 

Some of the brand’s varieties contain varying levels of caffeine, including Celsius BCAA, which has 100 milligrams, and Celsius Heat, which contains 300 milligrams.

The Food and Drug Administration advises that drinking up to 400 milligrams of caffeine per day is safe for most individuals.

‘We recommend no more than (2) 12 oz cans/(2) servings per day, and that you follow the daily serving recommendations for all other Celsius products,’ the brand states on its website. 

The caffeine in Celsius drinks is derived from guarana extract, a plant native to the Amazon. 

According to recent research, 70 percent of guarana produced is used by the beverage industry in soft and energy drinks, while the remaining amount is turned into powder. 

Celsius contains several active ingredients meant to increase energy. These are listed in a proprietary (prop) blend called ‘MetaPlus Proprietary Blend.’ 

While some are natural, others are not, and dietitians at Illuminate Labs suggest combing some is not recommended.

For example, the drinks include the stimulant glucuronolactone, which Illuminate labs said: ‘We recommend avoiding it when it’s combined with caffeine and taurine.’

Another ingredient is citric acid, which has been shown to cause whole-body inflammatory reactions in some individuals, according to a study published in Toxicology Reports.

Sucralose is also shown on the nutrition label, which a clinical trial found has ’caused unfavorable changes to insulin levels in young and healthy adults.’

Registered Dietician DJ Mazzoni shared: ‘Celsius may not be actively harmful, but we certainly don’t recommend drinking it regularly.’

In videos that have garnered over one million views, users claim that the Celsius energy drinks contain Ozempic, a medication used for type 2 diabetes and weight loss. Medical experts, however, have refuted the claims and said that it's just caffeine suppressing the appetite

In videos that have garnered over one million views, users claim that the Celsius energy drinks contain Ozempic, a medication used for type 2 diabetes and weight loss. Medical experts, however, have refuted the claims and said that it's just caffeine suppressing the appetite

While some are natural, others are not, and dietitians at Illuminate Labs suggest combing some is not recommended

What is Ozempic? 

Ozempic is a brand name for the medicine semaglutide, which suppresses appetite and triggers weight loss.

It was approved by the FDA for type 2 diabetes in 2017. 

The drug binds to the GLP-1 receptor, a protein that triggers hormones in the brain that keep the stomach full and tell the body to stop eating and avoid cravings.

In 2022, more than five million prescriptions for Ozempic, Mounjaro, Rybelsus (for another Novo drug that uses semaglutide), or Wegovy were written for weight management.

This is compared with just over 230,000 in 2019 — an increase of more than 2,000 percent over three years.

Already in 2023, doctors have doled out more than 832,700 prescriptions for Ozempic’s sister drug Wegovy. 

Does Celsius contain Ozempic? 

While the claim that Celsius drinks contain Ozempic has quickly gained traction on social media, experts have said this is false. 

‘Celsius does not have Ozempic in it. Celsius has caffeine,’ a pharmacist on TikTok who goes by The Millennial Pharmacist said in a video last month. 

‘Caffeine acts as an appetite suppressant, which can help you lose weight.’

The brand has also denounced these claims. 

‘Celsius products do not contain, and have never contained, semaglutide,’ a company spokesperson told FOX Business

However, the company has stated that the drinks can help burn calories, leading to weight loss.  

‘Celsius products provide functional energy that, when combined with proper diet and moderate exercise, is clinically proven to increase the metabolism through thermogenesis,’ the spokesperson said. 

This, ‘in turn causes the body to burn more calories and body fat than would normally occur with exercise alone.’

Can Celsius cause health problems? 

However, drinking too many of these beverages can lead to serious health effects. 

A 2021 case report detailed that a 21-year-old man in the United Kingdom was hospitalized for heart and kidney failure after drinking more than half a gallon worth of energy drinks every day for two years. 

He spent more than a week in intensive care and nearly two months total in the hospital. 

TikTok user Nick Errante posted a video detailing how he used to drink Celsius before every workout. However, he then showed himself getting a cardiac exam, suggesting that the drinks gave him heart issues

TikTok user Nick Errante posted a video detailing how he used to drink Celsius before every workout. However, he then showed himself getting a cardiac exam, suggesting that the drinks gave him heart issues

However, this is about 640 milligrams of caffeine, well over the FDA’s recommended daily limit. 

‘Celsius is not known to cause liver or kidney damage when it is consumed as recommended. Those who have experienced adverse effects from drinking Celsius are likely drinking more than recommended or have existing liver or kidney conditions,’ reads a statement on the product’s website. 

‘We recommend consulting with your health care provider if you are concerned that Celsius may impact your health.’

Additionally, a TikTok user named Nick Errante posted a video last year about heart issues the energy drink brought on, he claimed.

The video starts with him saying, ‘me drinking Celsius before every workout for the last 2 years thinking I’m healthy’ alongside a photo of him at the gym. It then ends with an image of him getting what appears to be a cardiology exam.

It’s unclear what specific issue he was experiencing. 

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